RFID Journal LIVE 2014 Show Report

RFID Child Tracking on School Bus CSL just returned from a very successful RFID Journal show in Orlando, Florida. Joining CSL this year was Roc Lastinger, one of our new VARs that has been providing projects for healthcare and cold chain transportation. There was close to 3,000 attendees and we received some high quality sales leads for the new products as well as additional requests from companies want to become a CSL VARs. A large percentage of the visitors were international.

We also introduced a change in our company focus from just being a hardware provider to a solution provider. As an example, the back drop of our booth depicted a use case for child security by tracking them on school busses with the new CS208-3G Intelligent Integrated RFID Reader with GPS and CSL’s Dual Mode BAP ID card for the child ID card.

We were a finalist for the best show demo award with our live demonstration of the CS208-3G communicating RFID tag data via SMS to a mobile phone. In addition, we showed a demonstration of our new CS8304 ColdChain Data Logging Tag communicating with our CS101 handheld reader. Click here for a copy of the CS8304 Datasheet.

Next year the show will be in San Diego, California on April 15-17, 2015. We plan to continue to innovate our product line and develop solutions further for the key RFID solution categories.

Intro to the CS101 Temperature Tag App

The CS101 is capable of reading Temperature Sensor Tags (part #CS8300-2), which send information about what the temperature is in/around the tag. After installing the CSL Temp Tag App on the CS101, you can enable this capability and read these tags. Here is a quick introduction to this application:
At first when you start up the application, no tags will be shown.

Temperature App Select

You can find nearby tags by clicking on the ‘Start’ button, or you can look for a specific tag by clicking on the ‘Find’ button. Once you’ve clicked on the ‘Start’ button, for example, all nearby Temperature Sensor Tags will be shown, as you see here:

Temperature App Select 2

To change certain settings in the tag such as the temperature threshold, click on the Configure tab, where you will be provided with the following options:

Temperature App Configure

You may also associate the tag with certain assets, using the Associate tab:

TempApp4

 

You may notice when you first scan for Temperature Sensor Tags, that under the temperature column, they are turned “OFF.” This is the default state, to save the battery in the tag. Once you are ready to turn it on and use it, you can do this in the Commission tab:

Temperature App Commission

Just click on the tag to highlight it, then click on the ‘Tag Commissioning’ button. This will turn the tag on. You can see this by going back to the Select tab. When you first go back to the Select tab, you will see nothing, and will need to click on the ‘Start’ button again to find the tag. Once found, you should now see the tag telling you what temperature it is at:

Temperature App Select

At this point, you cannot change any configuration settings. To change them, or to save the battery when the tag is not in use, you will need to turn the tag off. Just click on the tag, then go to the Configure tab, which now looks like this:

Temperature App Configure

To turn the tag off, click on the ‘Disable Monitoring’ button. When you’re ready to exit the application, just click on the Exit tab in the upper right corner.

Battery Assisted Passive RFID Technology Brings Low Cost Smart Temperature Monitoring To Cold Chain

CSL’s RFID temperature sensor portfolio makes cold chain temperature monitoring at the carton and item level convenient and affordable with their UHF EPC Class 3 Gen 2 Temperature Sensor Tags. Designed for operating under difficult and harsh cold chain environments, CSL’s Temperature Sensor Tags have the ability to monitor cold chain temperatures in cold storage applications, mobile overseas containers, and trailers moving from coast to coast. In addition, the tags are user programmable to set alerts according to business rules.

“Finally, there is a product that can perform well in the harshest, coldest and most demanding environments,” said Michael McCartney, Principal, QLM Consulting. “Companies can now feel confident in measuring and monitoring temperature through out the perishable cold chain.”

The Temperature Sensing tags are available now and CSL is working with partners on important applications such as tracking salmon in Europe, monitoring perishable fruit in a global cold chain application, and product verification in temperature controlled warehousing and transportation.

“We are excited to partner with CSL in providing a cost effective and reliable temperature monitoring system based on a UHF RFID tag,” claimed Viktor Varan, CEO of Enlight AS and HRAFN AS.

“One of the major advantages of our Temperature Sensing Tags, as compared to other tags on the market, is that our tags are fully EPC Class 3 Gen 2 compliant and can be read by ALL EPC Gen 2 readers,” reports Jerry Garrett, managing director, CSL. “Moreover, CSL’s Temperature Sensing Tags provides a cost-effective solution for cold chain monitoring to extend temperature logging down to the carton level.”

CSL’s Temperature Sensor Portfolio is available in several versions with options for multiple LEDs, push button, data logging, custom graphics, and more. The CS8300 Temperature Sensor Tag has a slim profile, is light weight, and low cost for cold chain tracking at the carton and item level. The CS8301 Rugged Temperature Sensor Tag is designed for the harshest, coldest and most demanding cold chain applications. The CS8301 Tag is fully enclosed by a plastic case to meet IP67 standards with LED lights to indicate temperature violations and battery life status. CSL provides a complete temperature monitoring system including demo software that is compatible with CSL’s full line of handheld and fixed readers, and antennas. For a demonstration, visit RFID Journal LIVE!, at CSL’s booth #229.

Link to PR Web Release:  http://www.prweb.com/releases/2013/5/prweb10680215.htm